Posted on

mum’s eve’s pudding, a blast from the past!

LIF-November 03, 2015-Eves pudding001-41-3

Eve’s pudding was probably my favourite dessert as a child and it always brings back memories when I bake this dish.

I have my friend Gayle to thank for this recipe, she has gone on at me for months to make her Eve’s pudding. The only problem was that I was quite determined that it had to be my Mum’s old recipe. My Mum made the best Eve’s pudding I’ve ever eaten. A proper old fashioned pudding from my childhood and given the abundance of apple trees in our garden, we ate this a lot! In my opinion Eve’s pudding should have apples tossed in a little cinnamon (although this is not traditional), topped with a soft sponge and a thick dome shaped crust! It is pudding heaven in a bowl.

LIF-November 03, 2015-Eves pudding001-27

A few weeks ago I was visiting my sister Judith, she’s moved into a new house and there are two mature apple trees in her garden. One of the trees was full of deliciously sweet eating apples. So armed with my Mum’s recipe and a bag of my sisters apples I set to making a few puddings. To watch my own children’s faces as they tried the pudding was sheer delight, they loved it as much as I did as child. I’ve made it weekly for the past month. I did make a pudding for my friend, Gayle was delighted and she scoffed the lot, although her son did sneak in and steal the crust off the top when she wasn’t looking.

mum’s eve’s pudding

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 5-6 firm eating apples (peeled, cored and cut into quarters)
  • 1 heaped tsp ground cinnamon (optional)
  • 8 oz self raising flour
  • 4 oz caster sugar
  • pinch salt
  • 4 oz stork margarine
  • 1/4 pint milk
  • 1 egg

Directions

Peel, core and quarter the apples and place in a saucepan with a small amount of water. Place on the hob over a medium-high heat with the lid on and cook for 4 minutes, you don't want to cook the apples, merely soften them slightly. Take off the heat and stir through the ground cinnamon before transferring to an round oven proof dish (approximately 20cm in diameter).
Place the flour, sugar, salt and margarine in a large mixing bowl and rub together with your fingers until you have the consistency of breadcrumbs.
Measure out the milk and add the egg, beat together to combine well. Add to the breadcrumb mixture and beat with a wooden spoon, the mixture should be of a thick consistency. Spread the mixture over the top of the apples, ensuring the dish is completely covered.
Place in a pre-heated oven at 170CFan for 50-60 minutes, check the mixture is cooked through by inserting a skewer into the sponge, if it comes out clean the cake is cooked. Remove from the oven and serve.

We are linking this recipe up to Cook, Blog, Share click on the link and check out some great recipes from fellow bloggers.

Posted on

apple pie, it’s all about apples!

LIF-October 07, 2015-

This week we’re all about apples! I’ve spent the past week making multiple pots of apple jelly, the most relaxing of activities and an annual event in my house. I headed to Pitmedden Gardens for their annual apple sale and picked up my jelly apples along with two bags of french crab apple. Whilst there Michelle asked me to pick up a bag of suitable cooking apples for apple pie. Michelle’s Canadian heritage equates pudding with pie, it was always pie in her house growing up: coconut cream pie, apple pie, pumpkin pie, butterscotch pie, chocolate pie. As a result Michelle makes very good pie and to prove it here’s her apple pie recipe and let me say my kitchen smells divine today … warm apple and cinnamon!

homemade apple pie

Ingredients

pastry

  • 250g plain flour
  • 125g unsalted butter (cold)
  • 1 medium egg (beaten)
  • 1-2 tsp cold water

filling

  • 6-7 medium sized apple (peeled & sliced)
  • 200g caster sugar
  • 1.5 tbsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • 30g butter

Directions

Make the pastry by adding the cold butter into the flour and work through your fingers until it forms a crumb texture. Alternatively, use a food processor and pulse until a fine crumb stage. Gradually add the beaten egg and mix until the dough comes together. If needed, add the cold water to help bind the mixture. Wrap in cling film and place in the fridge to chill for half and hour.
Meanwhile, peel and slice the apples into a large bowl. Add the lemon juice, sugar and cinnamon and leave to sit while you roll out the pastry.
Remove the pastry from the fridge, divide in two and roll one piece out thinly on a floured work surface. Gentley place into a 9 inch pie dish ensuring it is fit into all the edges. Fill with the sliced apples and dot with butter. Roll out the second piece of pastry and lay over the top, sealing the edges of the pastry with water.
Using a sharp knife, trim the pastry from the sides and crimp to seal. Make a few slices on the top to allow steam to escape while baking.
Bake in a preheated oven at 220 C (fan 190 C) for 10 min. Lower the oven temperature to 190 C (fan 170 C) and continue to bake for a further 40-45 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool before cutting and serving.

Posted on

apple jelly from the “jelly lady”

jelly making - jelly in jars001

I grew up with parents who were very self sufficient when it came to putting fresh garden produce on the table. We ate very well over the summer months and what could not be eaten was either stored over winter in our garage or frozen straight from picking. The garden was large and had a multitude of fruit trees and shrubs, from which my Mum would produce the most wonderful array of jams and jelly’s. This has spoilt me as you cannot beat homemade preserves. My Mum always made us jelly as we were fussy about bits in the jam! This is why I love this time of year as the apples are ready. I have become a keen jelly maker, my kids are happy to try any concoction of flavours if there are no “bits” in it!

I like a bit of free food and on a recent bramble picking walk with my Mum, on the dunes beside the beach at Lossiemouth, we came across an apple tree. Apples and brambles in one walk, what a result! Apples and brambles are a great combination, the brambles are tart and the jelly is lovely with a some venison, but equally good with a scone and a big blob of clotted cream! I like apple jelly on its own and that is the recipe I’ve given here. This year as well as the apple jelly, I’ve also made french crab apple jelly and also an apple and raspberry mix. The raspberries I’ve bought frozen from the supermarket.

Until last year Michelle only ever bought strawberry jam. I gave her a pot of mixed soft fruits and apple earning myself the title of Jelly Lady, as her girls come to me direct for supplies when the pot is empty. My husband claims he doesn’t have a sweet tooth (we beg to differ), but he loves my jelly and challenged Michelle to come up with a scone to match it! Challenge met!

apple jelly

Ingredients

  • 1 pint strained apple juice
  • 1 lb unrefined granulated sugar

Directions

Before you start get your equipment ready and set up. You will need a jelly bag, a stand to drain the fruit, a large pan or stockpot, a large pot to catch the strained juice, a jam thermometer, some sterilised jars and lids and wax discs for potting. Set up your jelly bag and stand (my Dad made mine but they are readily available in hardware stores and online) over the bowl that you are using to collect the strained liquid. Place a saucer in the freezer for testing the jelly later.
Sterilise your jars. My preferred method is to put them through a cycle in my dishwasher, unloading them while still hot onto a tray. I then place them in an oven at 170C until needed.
Wash the apples and cut into chunks, no need to core or peel them (remove any rotten pieces). Place your fruit in a large saucepan and add water to a level just below the top of the fruit.
Bring to the boil and then reduce to a simmer and cook the fruit until it is soft and you can insert a knife easily into the apple. Take the pan off the heat and gently spoon the mixture into the jelly bag. Do not be tempted to press the fruit down into the bag, nor squeeze the bag, as this will give you a cloudy jelly.  Leave the liquid to drain from the bag until it has finished dripping into the bowl below, then discard the fruit. (If doing a mixed jelly repeat this process with the second fruit.)
Once drained pour the juice into a large, heavy based saucepan or stockpot.  For every 1 pint of fruit liquid you will need to add 1lb of granulated sugar to the pan. I use ordinary unrefined granulated sugar as jam sugar tends to be more expensive. [Jam sugar contains added pectin which I have never needed to use as the apples contain enough themselves.]  
Put the pan on the heat and bring to the boil before reducing the heat a little to get a good rolling boil. Try not to stir the liquid as stirring will only reduce the temperature. As you are heating the liquid skim off an scum that may appear, whilst doing you no harm it doesn't look good once set and you do not want cloudy jelly.
Here comes the difficult bit, knowing when to take the jelly off the heat.  There are a number of tests, if using a jam thermometer the setting point for jelly is around 104.5C/220F. I use my thermometer to let me know when the jelly is almost ready but I prefer to use the wrinkle test as this what I watched my Mum doing when I was a child. You can tell when a jelly is approaching being ready as when it runs down the spoon it will begin to look thicker and start to wrinkle if you push it with a finger nail.  I place a plate in the freezer before I start making jelly. When I think the jelly is almost ready I spoon some onto the cold plate, pop it back in the freezer for a minute or two, then take it back out and push the jelly with my finger to see if it wrinkles.  If it does then the jelly is ready.  If you want a really firm set the wrinkle will stay in place after you have removed your finger. [This is the most difficult part of the process and it is something that becomes easier over time as your begin to know what to look for. That said, I have potted jelly into jars only to return it to the pan the following day for a further boil as it was just too soft a set!]
Pot the jelly while it is still hot into the sterilised jars. Take care as the liquid is very hot. I place a wax disc on top as it prevents the jelly drying out and also stops any mould from forming. Seal with a screw on lid and set aside to cool. Once cool label the jelly and store in a cool, dry place. The jelly should keep for at least year stored like this.

Note

This recipe makes a small amount of jelly and to be honest I rarely make jelly in quantities this small, simply multiply the recipe as you need. If doing a mix of fruits, for example apple and raspberry, cook and drain the two fruit separately, however note that soft fruit does not need cutting up before adding to the pan, boil it whole before straining through the jelly bag.

Once a jar of jelly has been opened it should be stored in the refrigerator and used within a month, although it rarely lasts that long in my house!

 

apple & cinnamon scones

Ingredients

  • 220g self raising flour
  • 50g soft light brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 50g unsalted butter
  • 100 ml buttermilk
  • 2 apples (grated)

Directions

Preheat oven to 220°C (200°C for fan assist oven)
Add dry ingredients to bowl, then add butter and work through fingers until it resembles fine breadcrumbs
In a measuring jug, mix egg with the buttermilk.
Add liquid ingredients into dry ingredients and mix with a fork gently to just bring together. DO NOT OVERMIX!
Fold through grated apples.
Turn out onto floured work surface and either pat down to 1 inch or roll gently. Cut with a scone cutter or knife to desired shape and size. Brush top with egg wash or milk.
Bake for 14-18 (depending on size) or until golden.
Posted on

apple & cinnamon cake

Apples001
Apples and Cornkisters is an annual event held at Pitmedden Gardens, a National Trust property in Aberdeenshire.  
pitmedden apples001
The gardens have a large orchard and every year they hold an event to sell off the fruits from the orchard, including a large variety of sweet apples, cooking apples, mixed bags of jelly making apples and also pears.  It is well advised getting there early as the queue to buy the fruit can be rather lengthy.
pitmedden apple bags001

This year the event took place on Sunday 28th September 2014.  Michelle and I went along with our families and I bought a number of mixed bags of jelly apples, some french crab apples and a bag of lovely small pears which I’m going to experiment with in a pear and walnut chutney (recipe to follow if it works out).

pitmedden apples Becca & Catherine001

Michelle went home armed with a couple of bags of Lane’s Prince Albert and Arthur Turner apples which she used to make this delicious apple and cinnamon cake.

 

Print

Apple and Cinnamon Cake

Course Baking
Keyword apple

Ingredients

For the Apple Cake

  • 5 apples
  • 5 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 3 cups flour
  • 2 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1/3 cup orange juice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda

For the Glaze

  • 1 1/2 cups confectioners sugar
  • 2 tablespoons margarine
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1-2 tablespoons water

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Slice apples, then toss with sugar and cinnamon.
  3. Mix flour, sugar, salt, eggs, oil, vanilla, orange juice, baking soda and powder.
  4. Mix everything together - you will have a very thick dough.

  5. Grease a bundt pan and fill it like this: dough, apple, dough, apple, dough.

  6. Bake for 1 1/2 hours.
  7. After it has cooled, drizzle glaze over cake.

 

 

Posted on

apple & cinnamon scones

Pumpkin Scone001

apple & cinnamon scones

Ingredients

  • 220g self raising flour
  • 50g soft light brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 50g unsalted butter
  • 100 ml buttermilk
  • 2 apples (grated)

Directions

Preheat oven to 220°C (200°C for fan assist oven)
Add dry ingredients to bowl, then add butter and work through fingers until it resembles fine breadcrumbs
In a measuring jug, mix egg with the buttermilk.
Add liquid ingredients into dry ingredients and mix with a fork gently to just bring together. DO NOT OVERMIX!
Fold through grated apples.
Turn out onto floured work surface and either pat down to 1 inch or roll gently. Cut with a scone cutter or knife to desired shape and size. Brush top with egg wash or milk.
Bake for 14-18 (depending on size) or until golden.